Do it yourself and learn by doing

"Increasingly complex global challenges are heightened by the lack of internal capacity to come up with innovations that could have a lasting impact. The result has been an increase in the search for innovative learning", according to the official website.

One of the characteristics of an entrepreneur is the courage to take risks, to prototype, to be prepared to make mistakes, to experiment and test again until arriving at an innovative and relevant solution. But entrepreneurship is only learnt by doing. Entrepreneurship is about you do.

It is from within this practical scenario, and using DIY as a pun, that Development Impact and You: Practical Tools to Trigger & Support Social Innovation was born As indicated by the name, it provides a set of essential tools that support entrepreneurs during their trajectory.

It has been so successful that DIY established a partnership with Open University to promote innovative forms of learning. “Increasingly complex global challenges are heightened by the lack of internal capacity to come up with innovations that could have a lasting impact. The result has been an increase in the search for innovative learning”, according to the official website.

When it comes to innovation, the first tools that come to mind are linked to technology. However, online content and technological devices on their own won’t lead to deep learning or the capacity to innovate.

This movement provides a space for experimentation, which enables the rapid, cheap and experimental creation of objects and prototypes based on the premise of do first (albeit intuitively) and reflect/theorize later” HELOISA NEVES.

One of the initiatives that deserves to be highlighted is the Maker Movement, of which the author and entrepreneur Chris Anderson is one of its biggest enthusiasts. He wrote the book Makers: A new industrial revolution, in which the doers are the creators of new products and services. What does this have to do with entrepreneurship education? Everything, given it is founded in the philosophy of “learn by doing”.

The thought here is that with the internet, collaborative culture, open source software, and cheaper technology, such as 3D printers and arduino, people can make objects, invent products and see their inventions become a reality. The maker culture is present in many places, from classrooms to large corporations.

This movement provides a space for experimentation, which enables the rapid, cheap and experimental creation of objects and prototypes based on the premise of do first (albeit intuitively) and reflect/theorize later” says HELOISA NEVES, one on the main references for the maker movement in Brazil and co-author of the book Fab Lab: The Vanguard of the New Industrial Revolution.

also read

Technology and social inclusion together for the education of the future
Keep Reading
Maker Education: community building and do-it-ourselves mentality
Keep Reading
Mundo Maker: hands-on for a meaningful learning experience
Keep Reading

Quer ficar sabendo de tudo antes? Assine a
newsletter e receba novidades no seu e-mail.

x
área restrita
Usuário
senha