Little entrepreneurs: learn more about businesses owned by children

Is there a right age to start a business? Definitely not. Some kids take advantage of their imagination to turn playtime into opportunities for entrepreneurship. While drawing, playing, or playing with friends, they can find out a solution to their everyday problems and, if they are immersed in an environment that fosters entrepreneurship, a solution that can impact many other people’s lives.

Teaching entrepreneurship to children since an early age, even from small ideas, is a way to prepare them for the future as they learn the importance of planning and organizing to achieve their goals. Want to meet some of these little entrepreneurs? We have selected some examples of young people who turned their ideas into companies and achieved success before adulthood!

Robert Nay

Have you heard of the 14 year old boy who is considered the new Mark Zuckeberg? In 2011 Robert Nay created an iPhone app that became a hit and put out the worldwide success Angry Birds on App Store. His app, a free game called Bubble Ball, has been downloaded by over two million users. He came up with the idea at home over a month using a platform called Corona SDK. With the success of the app, he founded Nay Games and plans to develop other products, this time to actually be sold.

Leanna Archer

Leanna Archer is an example of how to turn a game into big business. When she was eight years old, she began mixing ingredients and making hair products in New York, according to a recipe from her Haitian great-grandmother. At first, she was the only one to use the products she made, but over time, some people close to Leanna became interested in her shampoos and lotions. So she decided to increase production. Today, after more than 10 years, Leanna earns about $ 500,000 in sales annually. The business, Leanna’s Essentials, has grown so much that she has to involve eight more people in her day to day business, and the next step is to settle into her own office.

João Camargo

Joao Camargo’s taste for cooking began at the age of eight, when he made his first cookies. Like most children, João wanted to buy a puppy and started using his skills for that: selling candies. Today, his own brand “Do João”, which he founded at the age of 13, has naked cakes and other desserts.

Moziah Bridges

The desire to “dress in style” eventually made Moziah Bridges a young CEO. He started his business at the age of nine and has sold over $ 200 million in bow ties. The idea of ​​his venture came about when he searched for ties that were different and stylish, and found very few options in the market. Like many other cases, for his “Mo’s Bows” brand to grow, Moziah had some help. While participating in the Shark Tank TV show, Karen Katz, the president of Neiman Marcus (an e-commerce specializing in luxury goods), saw him in the show and decided to offer a deal to resell his products.

Noa Mintz

In August 2012, while still in school, Noa found a solution to her frustration and turned it into business. In childhood, she had no luck with her nannies until she found a “perfect” one. Satisfied with the babysitter’s service, her mother began to refer her to others. These nominations gave a great idea to the girl, who then created the Nannies by Noa nanny agency, which connects mothers and nannies, who go through an interview and have verified references, making it easier to find the “perfect nanny”. Today, the young woman makes about $ 500,000 a year.

João Pedro Miranda Caldas

The Brazilian João Pedro Miranda Caldas, owner of “Mirim”, was first interested in a camera when moving to Paris and fell in love with photography. As a pastime, in the first months living in the light city, he took pictures and sold them on his website. With these sales, at age 13 the boy managed to save money to invest in new equipment and continue to improve his products, which he sends to his clients with a special dedication. João doesn’t have a big business yet, like the previous examples, but he’s already on his way: making his hobby a venture.

Cory Nieves

The business of the American Cory Nieves started out of necessity. At 10, the boy was tired of waiting for the school bus every day. He then decided to sell cookies to raise funds and buy a car so his mother could drive him to school. With a stall in front of his home in New Jersey, he began selling homemade 100% natural cookies for a dollar a unit. By participating in a television program in the United States, he won his mother’s car and took $ 10,000 to invest in his business. Interested parties can now pre-order cookies through his website and pick up the order on the spot. The cookies are so successful that they make $ 1,000 a weekend, opening the door to their own brand, “Mr. Cory’s”.

The entrepreneurial experience is a great ally in the learning process. By developing and stimulating such activities in the classroom or in the family, the result can be a future for entrepreneurial and more active children in their communities.

Did you know that games can also stimulate the entrepreneurial spirit of the little ones? Discover how play time contributes to educating more problem-solving citizens.

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